PZYK 2021 — 15 May 2021

PZYK IS DEAD. LONG LIVE PZYK.
It is with great sadness we are today announcing the cancellation of PZYK 2021.

Despite the positive vaccination news, we still have no certainty as to whether it will be feasible to host the festival in May 2021. With months of continued planning ahead to realise PZYK 2021, we do not have the luxury of waiting until the spring before making a decision as to whether we can welcome our congregation to Liverpool in May.
We appreciate that people travel from around the world to visit the festival and out of respect we want to provide clarity as soon as possible.
We were incredibly excited about presenting the festival at a new venue and we have made the decision to cancel with a heavy heart.
We look forward to a point in the future when COVID-19 is but a distant nightmare and we can come together once more.
Refunds will be processed automatically by our ticketing partner Eventim on Monday 30th November.
All original tickets remain valid for the re-arranged date. If you have any further ticketing enquiries, please contact Eventim here.

Yours in drone, always.
PZYK
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KEELEY FORSYTH

The songs comprising KEELEY FORSYTH’s debut are, she states simply, “like blocks of metal that drop from the sky.”
With its minimal arrangements placing her recollections and dissections of sometimes harrowing experiences front and centre, ‘Debris’ showcases her elemental voice and an outpouring of candid, haunting lyrics detailing the seismic ruptures which take place behind closed doors. “There was a lot going on in my life that was heavy and hard,” she adds. “Songs were made under that moment.”

Born and raised in Oldham, Forsyth first made her name as an actor, but while the creation of music has been a constant feature in her life, she’s taken the long road to its release. A deeply intuitive and singular musician, she began writing several years ago, accompanying herself on harmonium and accordion.

Inspiration struck one evening while listening to the radio, where she first encountered pianist and composer Matthew Bourne’s work. “I heard his music and suddenly I could hear them both together,” she says of her songs and his compositions. “I felt compelled to write to him. He got straight back and said he loved what I was doing.” What followed were quick and instinctive collaborations with Bourne and producer and musician Sam Hobbs, with the initial burst of momentum Forsyth felt when writing carried through into the studio, preserving the intricacies and accidents that make an album human.

keeleyforsyth.com